Hints and Tips for Starting out in Food Manufactoring

Some tips and questions I wrote for a new customer starting out in food  manufacturing

  •  Identify your point of difference. – this is not “you”!  
  • Develop a unique selling proposition 
  • Identified who your clients are (first and second tier). 
  • Spread your exposure by having multiple clients
  • Make sure you have enough margin built into your products to cover distribution and sales.
  • Consider automated purchasing – some customers demand it. 
  • Is your website oriented for your target market 
  • Review your marketing portfolio. Ask who, where, what, how type questions
  • Know why your customers will buy your product
  • Have you got a secure and reliable source of ingredients
  • Big companies may demand large rebates -understand the politics 
  • Are you set up to fill your orders in a timely manner 
  • Have you got good control and reporting mechanisms 
  • Are your processes and controls really safe?
  • Do you understand the laws you need to comply with?
  • Do your labels work for your customer 
  • What support and advice can you access 

If you need help contact me at thinking@markcollins.co.nz

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“GLOBAL” management can kill local initiative.

As more modern businesses become global, there seems to be an ever increasing   tendency to disregard the local style. There are many ways a task may be achieved and too often we see an over prescriptive approach dictated from an office in a city many   km’s away from where the action is. In many cases the prescribed approach may have   originated or be directed from a different country! How could we manage this better? A start may be to genuinely consider the following points:

  • Identify the reason and benefits to be gained from standardizing the processes?  
  • What does the situation look like from a local perspective: client, staff and community?  
  •  What can be done to mitigate any negative consequences?
  • What are the cultural and behavioral differences of people in the place of process  origin as compared to the place being pressed to change to conform and change? Size of population, regional spread and parochialism are significant factors  

 

Is the company reason believable? “Global best practice” is often not what it says. Make sure the change delivers these gains or rethink the change. This is so easy to do, and so often not done. The result is a loss of individual ownership, commitment and  initiative by local managers and employees. This is passed on to the customer in the form of lack of can do, flexibility and customer focus, resulting in a loss of confidence and  belief by staff and customers alike.

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Thinking Differently- over 100 idea starters

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10 important actions to managing out sourced service provider’s.

Many services are out sourced these days from catering, pest control, laundry,   printing, mail services, accounting, payroll, marketing, maintenance, grounds, cleaning and the list goes on…. Just about all company’s and organizations have out sourced one or more of their support services . The consequence of out sourcing services ranges from it being;   very successful and efficient, to very frustrating, difficult and not cost effective. Organizations that have been successful out sourcing a service or services get: good quality, excellent customer service, effective service delivery, accountability and effective cost management.  Without exception they will have all done the following things well:

1. Scoped and documented the service being out sourced.
2. Adopted a robust and thorough tender and selection process.
3. Contracted the service provider to deliver on the promises in their   proposal.
4. Included incentives and penalty clauses.
5. Created flexibility so as the organisation’s service need changes so does   the contractor.
6. Developed appropriate KPI’s.
7. Demand transparency but allow a fair profit margin on good service.
8. Measure the service provided with independent audits.
9. Maintain good communications and reiterate the area of focus.
10. Track performance throughout contract term and retender periodically.

These can be broken down into three groups – Before tendering, the tender process and then contractor management.

For more information on service contract management or assistance with the above 10 success points contact me at mark@markcollins.co.nz

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Thinking Differently- over 100 idea starters

I have just released my first E book and for your interest I have gifted you the link to access your very own copy - pass it on to your friends!!!
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